top of page
Search
  • Writer's picturezavalalegal

Adjustment of Status for U Visas/Victims of Crimes

Updated: Aug 12, 2021



Now that you have a U Visa (AKA: U Nonimmigrant Status) it might be time for you to consider preparing for or filing for adjustment of status to become a legal permanent resident. Given that the U Visa process takes many years and immigration practices have changed dramatically over the last 4-5 years it might be time for you to review your U Visa and Waiver packet to make sure you are properly prepared for the adjustment process.


Although U Visa adjustment applicants are not subject to some of the more common grounds of inadmissibility such as "alien smuggling", "10 year permanent bar" etc., you still need to address them in the adjustment process. Even if these or other grounds of inadmissibility may or may not have been waived when you filed your U Visa waiver, you will still need to address these issues at the time of filing for adjustment. Even if you did not request a waiver for one or more of the common grounds of inadmissibility you might still be able to apply for adjustment and become a legal permanent resident.


The most important thing is to have a copy of your U Visa filing and be sure to tell your immigration legal representative about any issues you may have had with immigration and law enforcement officials. You should also answer all immigration questions on any benefits applications correctly so your immigration legal representative can properly advise and prepare you for your adjustment process.


Remember, once you become a legal permanent resident, you are able to travel abroad and will be eligible to apply for naturalization in 5 years. Call our offices if you need advice concerning your immigration matter at 512-443-4788.

11 views0 comments

Recent Posts

See All

How Will Immigration Know that I've been in the U.S.?

Simply because you or someone you know may have NEVER been arrested, detained, or otherwise registered with any U.S. government agency such as the IRS, HHS, SSA etc., doesn't mean that you may not hav

To File or Not to File an I-130 Visa Petition?

To know whether a particular individual ‘should’ file an I-130 visa petition for a family member can easily become very complicated particularly if the Petitioner is a Legal Permanent Resident (LPR) o

Comentários


bottom of page